All posts by thestorybehindhersuccess

Jody Adams -127



A restaurant is like a farm. It requires attention 24 hours a day. -Chef Jody Adams

When superstar chef Jody Adams was growing up in Providence, Rhode Island, she watched her working mom make dinner with natural ingredients and entertain with grace and true hospitality. The daughter of two librarians, she got the chance to travel to Europe and experience international cuisine. It wasn’t long before she knew she wanted to be a chef. In this interview, Jody takes us on a career journey defined by a powerful work ethic: “I burned myself and cut myself like nobody’s business, but I was determined to succeed. I just put my head down and worked harder than I knew I could.” Mentored by Julia Child, Lydia Shire and Gordon Hamersley, Jody put her stake in the ground in 1994 with Rialto in Harvard Square, spending 22 years nurturing her signature Mediterranean dishes and growing a stellar reputation. With the closure of Rialto in 2016, she ventured into the creation of TRADE, Saloniki and Porto, with partners Eric Papachristos, Sean Griffing and Jon Mendez. The winner of the prestigious James Beard Award, Chef Adams was inducted into the James Beard Foundation’s Who’s Who of Food & Beverage in America in 2018. The lessons she has learned along the way about entrepreneurship and persistence are inspiring for anyone with a dream: “It takes getting up off your butt no matter how hard you feel and no matter how impossible it looks. Try to figure out the next move forward. Believe in what you are doing and get back up again.” Jody Adams has put her own advice to good use throughout the pandemic by becoming an advocate for small, independently owned restaurants in Boston and beyond. A firm believer that mom & pop restaurants are not only the backbone of America, but the heartbeat of our communities, Jody is determined to do what she can to help. www.saverestaurants.com/take-action. “Generosity and giving are what will see us through”, says Jody. For a dose of wisdom you can use, hit that download button.


Molly Howes -126



When something goes wrong between people, that doesn’t have to be the end of the story. There are things you can do to make a repair. You can heal hurt between people. –Molly Howes

For many years, I’ve been swimming in a lap lane with a really kind and wonderful woman named Molly. We’d talk about the temperature of the water, and how we really should be swimming longer and harder. And then one day, she told me that she was an author, and that her new book was being published. I asked what it was about, and instantly knew she’d be perfect for this show. For the last 35 years, Molly Howes, PhD has maintained an independent psychotherapy practice. She’s a Harvard-trained clinical psychologist who has witnessed the losses her patients feel when they have been unable to give or receive an apology. Her groundbreaking book is called A Good Apology and is now available world wide. In this interview, Molly gives us her “four steps to make things right” and explains why saying “I’m sorry” is so hard for many of us to do. At a time in our country when pent-up hurt and anger abound, this book gives us all a chance to reach across our differences and make amends. Always honest and thoughtful, Molly shares her own personal story which is woven in loss and a lifelong need to mend things and make them right. No one goes through life unscathed. We’ve all been hurt, and we all need to heal. It may be surprising, but the breaches themselves aren’t the real problem, our inability to fix them is what causes us the most trouble. Says Molly: “An apology is for the other person, but it’s also for you, because it’s the right thing to do.” If you’ve spent years trying to figure out how to apologize for something, or how to heal an old hurt that continues to break your heart, hit that download button. You’ll know exactly what to do in 20 minutes! #clinicalpsychology #Harvard #sorrynotsorry


Sara Gotschewski -125



They walk 10 miles each day to get water, and sometimes, it’s dirty water. -Sara Gotschewski

In this episode, we meet senior architect and Come Unity volunteer Sara Gotschewski, an American woman who was raised in Tokyo. Once a student at an international school, Sara remembers being surrounded by classmates from 70 different countries, relishing the chance to learn about different cultures and traditions. At 16, she and a handful of classmates made their first trip to Africa where they volunteered at a local school in Namibia. On that trip, Sara fell in love with Africa and no matter where her life takes her, Sara’s compass is always pointed there. Now a senior architect at a firm in Chicago, Sara is passionate about sharing her skills with Come Unity: “I have always known that I wanted to follow a career that allowed me the opportunity to provide positive impact in the world. It’s an honor to be part of creating something for others.” The mission of Come Unity is to partner with East African communities to develop sustainable solutions to poverty www.comeunitynow.org. Although chronic poverty is a way of life in Kenya, the culture is built on generosity: Sara says: “The big difference between the U.S and Kenyan culture is that we give when we have excess. In Kenyan culture they give when there is a need.” In this interview, she tells the story of a community where women walk 10 miles to get water that isn’t even clean. Thanks to donations and hard work on the ground, Sara and the team at Come Unity built a well that brings clean water, better health, and empowerment to the village. For a look inside the heart and mind of a woman who understands the true meaning of the word “community”, just hit that download button. #inspiringstories #cleanwater


Deborah Henson-Conant -124



Whether you are young, or you are 80, 90, or even 100 years old, that moment when you make that connection and you have a partnership with an instrument…is a magic moment.
-Deborah Henson-Conant

When she was growing up, Deborah Henson-Conant refused to take music lessons. All she wanted to do was figure out for herself how to make music, writing her first musical at only 12. A prolific singer-songwriter in her teens, she agreed to play the harp for her college band and that pivotal decision has guided her entire career. You see, Deborah figured out a way to make a gigantic instrument smaller, easy to carry, and electric. She is known worldwide as the woman who liberated the concert harp by shrinking it down, strapping it on and plugging it in so that audiences large and small could hear every single gorgeous note. Her recent TEDx talk chronicles her collaboration with French harp company, CAMAC which resulted in the creation of the “DHC” harp, now played by harpists worldwide. In this interview, Deborah shares her passion for music and especially for the unbridled use of imagination. Never someone to color inside the lines, she is a trailblazer for musicians young and old who want to forge their own path. Nominated for a Grammy for a long-form symphonic concert of her original music performed in collaboration with the Grand Rapids Symphony, Deborah was delighted that PBS stations nationwide released the concert nationwide. Invention & Alchemy is now available to the world via streaming as a fundraiser during the Covid-19 pandemic, Deborah’s greatest hope is that the concert video inspires anyone who wants to make music. For a journey into the creative mind of a musical genius, hit that download button. #musician #harpist


Amy Schmidt -123



Success for me is a journey. -Amy Schmidt

As women age, we wonder: am I doing what I was meant to do? Am I running on all cylinders? Is this all there is? Amy Schmidt has been asking these kinds of questions of herself and others through her podcast series: Fearlessly Facing 50 and her new book: Cannonball: Fearlessly Facing Midlife And Beyond www.fearlesslyfacingfifty.com. In an easy, conversational style Amy shares her personal stories and those of many other women in an effort to inspire us all to make the biggest splash possible in our lives. Married for 27 years and the mother of three, Amy openly shares her life story in this interview including her aspirations to be “the next Joan Lunden” when she first got her start in broadcast news. Born and raised outside of Milwaukee, she was her parent’s “oops child” with 18 years between herself and her oldest sibling. The message for Amy was always positive: “live your dreams. You can do anything.“ It was her father who urged her to someday write a book and Cannonball: Fearlessly Facing Midlife And Beyond is that book, full of wit and wisdom for anyone north of 40. In a world where the exuberance of youth is celebrated, this exceptional woman is asking us all to look at the highlight reel of our lives and to celebrate not only our accomplishments, but our glorious next chapters. Amy’s advice to women facing 50 and beyond? “We judge ourselves too much. We get filled with these feelings of self-doubt and fear. I want women to close their eyes and reflect on what they’ve accomplished. Take a look at your own highlight reel, because we’ve all got one.” #midlife


Nancy Gaudet-Aittaniemi -059



Have you ever heard the expression:  “love will find a way?” Meet Nancy Gaudet-Aittaniemi.  A very successful senior vice president for a commercial real estate company, Nancy’s success story is not just about climbing the ladder to take on a leadership role in a male-dominated industry.  It is about the power of a mother’s love for her child. You see, Nancy’s only child was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at only 9, and his chronic condition led her down a path that has been both terrifying and inspiring. Faced with the decision to stay stuck in her grief and hover over him or to let her son experience life to the fullest, Nancy chose to show Ryan that he could do anything he put his mind to.  Now a sophomore in college, Ryan is a seasoned bike enthusiast who has ridden in juvenile diabetes fundraising challenges in the United States and Europe.  As the leader of a monthly support group for Type 1 Moms, Nancy has taken other parents by the hand and has been a passionate volunteer and supporter of the JDRF,  the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes.  She is currently training to ride in her 4th bike race:  the Amelia Island Ride To Cure Diabetes and her coach?  You guessed it, Nancy’s son Ryan.   #JDRFRide    #storybehindhersuccess    #16LifeLessons    #mydoveproductions